parkrun tourism: Seaton

We’ve done a fair bit of parkrun tourism this year and, as our tourism page is starting to show, have been a little neglectful when it comes to writing them up.  So I’m turning over a new leaf and writing about Seaton parkrun within a few hours of its first event.

Inaugural parkrun tourism is a bit of a controversial topic, as in places like London it can completely overwhelm a new event.  This is only the second time we’ve attended a first event (the other being Burnham and Highbridge), and in both cases it’s just happened to be a weekend that worked out well.  Having said that, even with all the inaugural tourists today there were 188 finishers, so definitely a different scale to London!

Seaton parkrun is a two lap out-and-back course along the promenade.  I realise that makes it sound boring, but stick with me!  Having parked up in our ‘usual’ Seaton car park, we walked down to the prom and I was relieved to see toilets by the start/finish area.  When you’re nearly halfway through pregnancy these things are crucial.

While we waited for the start, Ben had a trial of taking the buggy on the pebble beach, and determined it just wouldn’t work.  One of the Event Directors spoke to us and confirmed our suspicions – that the course page shouldn’t have said buggies are welcome.  She was very lovely about it, and Ben worked out a way to complete the course without having to take the buggy on the beach.

We crowded round for the run briefing, which I thought was very well done to balance the needs of both tourists and local first timers.  I particularly liked that we were told to keep people around us quiet, as chatting during briefings gets annoying.  Having bunched up into the crowd, we then had to fight our way to the back for the start.  Ben because he had a buggy and me because… I wanted to give the others a chance?

As invariably happens starting at the back, I didn’t notice the start, so started my watch a little late.  But we were off.  First up is a short trip to the end of the prom, filled with shouts of “Keep left!” as runners started heading back the other way.  The cones to turn around were nicely spaced, so that the turn wasn’t too sharp and it also naturally separated the two directions of runners.

Next task: run to the other end of the prom.  The path is tarmac all the way, making it really easy to run on.  Unsurprisingly, quite a way before I reached the other end there were runners heading back, but the path was wide enough (for the majority that were considerate) and it added to the atmosphere.  Before long we’d reached the end of the prom path… only that’s not where the course turns round.

The final bit of the out-and-back is, in fact, on the pebble beach.  Perfect time to take a little walk break.  Although, even walking was hard work.  Ben later confirmed that he had left the buggy with the last marshal on the path, taking the pebble section unaccompanied.  Still, after the pebbles I felt a spring in my step returning to tarmac, and had no problem returning to a run (at my typical speedy pace).

The promenade path at Seaton is on the beach side of the sea wall.  While on the way out we’d been running next to the wall, on the way back we were running next to a drop, beyond which was pebble beach and then glorious wavy sea.  Faster runners started to overtake, and we were encouraged to keep as close to the left of the path as possible, which was a little tricky given the drop and my misplaced centre of gravity.

The backdrop

The backdrop

Going past the split for the finish, there was the nice feeling of (mostly) just having to do the same again… and knowing that no one else would lap me.  As I trundled along to the first end I suddenly looked up at the beautiful cliffs, and realised quite how beautiful a location I was running in.  I then encountered an incredibly rare hiccup in a well organised event, in that runners who had already finished were stood across the course.  Sadly this is a common sight for slower parkrunners.

My trip back down the prom was spent admiring the views, thanking marshals, appreciating cheers from faster runners, and listening to the gushing waves.  Gosh I was glad those toilets had been there.  After successfully navigating the pebbles a second time, it was onto the home stretch to head back.  I was joined for a short while by a very happy 3 year old, who I had to hand back to Ben before taking the split to the finish.  Which is on the beach.

It didn’t seem right to walk so close to the end, so instead I just considerably slowed down.  Then I heard people coming up behind me, and much as I take parkrun at my own pace I still hate being beaten to the line.  So the last few metres may have been taken a little harder than planned.  Ben’s tactic for this section had been to leave the buggy at the start of the beach, and then walk to the end with our long-suffering daughter.

Say "parkrun tourism"

Say “parkrun tourism”

Finish tokens and barcode scanning went very smoothly, and we had the chance to thank some more of the volunteers before heading to the nearby Pebbles cafe for post-run tea and milkshake.

The event was incredibly well organised, better than a fair few longer-running events we’ve been too.  The atmosphere was brilliant.  Every single marshal was smiling, clapping and cheering (sadly that’s not always the case).  The runners were also great at cheering each other on – Ben in particular found he got a lot of encouragement (for being the nutter with the buggy).

So this brand new parkrun is very definitely on our recommend list, as long as you don’t run with either a dog or a buggy.  Now, where to next?

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